Tag: cat health

What to Do When Your Pet Hates Nail Trims

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As your pet’s nails grow longer and longer, you know that dreaded day is coming. You’ll bring your pet to the groomer or vet, or attempt to trim at home, and they’ll throw a fit that seems to get worse every time. Your pet might even scratch or bite to get away. When your pet…

| Dogs, Cats

How to Squash Your Cat’s Hairball Problem

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It’s the only sound that will jolt you up from a dead sleep. That heh.. heh… heh.. just before the dreaded AAACK all over your carpet… or your bed. Trichobezoar is the medical term for a hairball, and may also accurately describe that disturbing sound. Hairballs not uncommon in domestic cats, especially those with long…

| Cats

A Quick Guide to Bathing Your Cat

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Cats typically keep themselves clean, but even a cat that cleans herself obsessively may need a bath sometimes. Cats with long fur, those that cannot reach every part of their body to keep clean, and cats with skin conditions all may need regular baths. If your cat gets fleas, or is ever covered in a…

| Cats

Why Are So Many Pets Getting Cancer?

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November is Pet Cancer Awareness Month, a reminder to stay in-the-know about cancer symptoms, treatment options and possible causes so you can enjoy the longest, healthiest life possible with the animals you love. Cancer accounts for almost half of dogs and about a third of cats over 10 years old. It’s more common in dogs…

| Dogs, Cats

How to Protect Your Pets from Poor Air Quality and Wildfire Smoke

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Smoke from Canadian wildfires is currently blanketing the DC area, triggering air quality alerts and making it difficult to breathe. But it’s not just people who are affected by poor air quality, our pets are too! In fact, our pets may even be at greater risk than we are from wildfire smoke due to their…

A Quick Guide to Keeping Your Pet’s Teeth Healthy

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Your pet’s bad breath and discolored teeth aren’t just unpleasant and unattractive. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, by the time your dog or cat is three years old, they will very likely have some early evidence of periodontal (gum) disease, which will worsen as your pet grows older if you don’t take effective…

| Dogs, Cats