By: | | Pet Care Tips

Your pets’ collars, lovingly selected to complement their features and fitted with personalized ID tags, can be a danger to their safety. Approximately 26,000 collar related accidents occur each year, many fatal when the collar closes the animal’s airways long enough to strangle them to death.

When You Might Consider Using Collars Indoors

Collars with up-to-date identification tags inscribed with your phone number and address are very effective at getting your pets home quickly in the event that they are lost. If your pets tend to run out into the street when you open your front door, or if they’re escape artists that go over or under fences, you may want to keep collars on indoors.

You should also have your pets micro-chipped. Even if they are wearing a collar when lost, the collar could get lost or damaged. Also, a microchip can prove your ownership if someone steals your dog and replaces their collar and tags.

When You Should ALWAYS Remove Collars

Always take your dog’s collar off before locking them in their crate. Inside their crate, they have no chance of getting lost, and some parts of the crate could get caught on the collar.

Always take your dog’s collar off if you have a multi-pet household of animals that are to be left alone together, especially if they like to play with one another. Collars can get caught on paws and jaws and two collars can even get stuck together. Also beware at dog parks, where rambunctious play can lead to tangling.

Always remove martingale collars after walks because the chain or nylon loop can easily get caught on your dog’s paw or objects in their environment.

Always remove collars when pets are left unattended outdoors. It’s ideal to watch your pets whenever they’re outside, but that’s not realistic for everyone. If you can’t watch your pet, at least secure the perimeter so they cannot jump out or dig out, and let them go collarless.

Breakaway Collars as a Safer Option

If you have a cat, you’ve probably seen, or may even own, a collar with a breakaway clasp. The clasp easily opens with a small amount of pressure, so it would take very little struggle for your cat to wiggle free if they were to get stuck.

Breakaway collars also exist for dogs, though you’re unlikely to find one at the pet store. You could ask the pet store manager to make as special order, or just order one online. A breakaway collar would only be used indoors, as it would turn your dog loose on walks.

A harness could also be a good way to keep identification tags on your dog while reducing the risk of strangulation. Harnesses can get caught, too, but many styles do not constrict the neck. They could, however, possibly cause injury if your dog gets stuck and struggles to break free.

Keep Your Pets Safe When You’re Not Home

Many accidents occur when pet owners are at work or on vacation, especially when pets experience separation anxiety. A professional pet sitter can check on your animals when you are away. Ready Pet Go sitters are trained in pet CPR and educated in handling emergencies. Contact us to set up a consultation.